Illinois Dash For Cash

Dash For CashThe Illinois Dash For Cash is the term the Illinois Treasure’s Department uses to describe their unclaimed money search website.
CHICAGO — You say you could never lose your money? You could be surprised, NBC5’s Kim Vatis said, because according to the State Treasurer, there could be a one-in-five chance that some of the forgotten funds held by the Illinois Treasurer’s Office belong to you. All you need is your name on the Illinois Dash For Cash website , and the state’s computers will figure out if you’re entitled to any of the unclaimed money. “I had a deceased aunt, with a savings account (that was) never claimed,” said Fadi Zanayed. The unclaimed funds usually come from forgotten bank accounts, stocks, bonds, security deposits and insurance checks, Vatis reported, but sometimes, she said, even entire estates go unclaimed. While the average payout is $400 to $600, Vatis said, there are also bigger windfalls. Steve Dugan, for instance, was able to claim more than $20,000. “I was kind of shocked,” Dugan said. “How could I have lost this without knowing it?” One claim alone gave him a $13,000 check. “They told me Chase Manhattan Bank, out of New York,” Dugan said of the money’s source. “I don’t know (why it was there) — could have been stocks, bonds, inheritance.”


 


State Treasurer Judy Baar Topinka initiated “Illinois Dash for Cash,” the state’s campaign to get people their money. “We just try to pump it back,” Topinka said. “Over the last two years, we’ve returned $125 million to people.” The biggest payout, so far, has been $800,000, according to Topinka. Topinka said the number of potential claimants gives Illinois residents a one-in-five chance of being on the list of people whose money is being held by the state of Illinois. “We’re talking five million names and $1 billion,” Topinka said. “So, really, with one-in-five chances, you’ve got something better than the lottery!” The billion dollars’ worth of unclaimed assets that have been abandoned for five years or more sit in a vault at the state capitol in Springfield.

Allissa Camp, Director of Unclaimed Property, showed Vatis the stash of goods. “And it’s not just money,” Camp said. “These jewels and valuables are simply left in safety deposit boxes. An amazing array of collectibles from time past — wills and even war medals. It’s sad. These once meant something to someone, and either they or their heirs have forgotten about it.”

Camp said that anything that is not claimed is auctioned off, because there’s not enough space to keep it.

It costs you nothing to get the money back if you find your name on the list, and it doesn’t take much time either. The state has a Dash for Cash Web site that takes you through the process.

The list of unclaimed money is updated every six months, so even if you’ve checked for your name before, it’s worth repeating the effort.Topinka told Vatis that even though it’s easy to check if you have unclaimed goods being held by the state, it’s more important to avoid the situation.

“Tell someone that these accounts are out there,” Topinka said. “Often people die and don’t tell anybody about it, and the family doesn’t know.” That’s why it’s critical to keep an inventory of all your assets, Vatis advised. Let someone know about it and always make a change of address when you move, so your money can find you.
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Billions of dollars go unclaimed every year.  There are millions of people that are unaware that they have money owed to them.  You can get a nice commission just letting them know about it.

Learn how to make money as an Unclaimed Money Finder


Comments

  1. Linda Diane Ross says

    I really don’t understand why everybody is money hungry. Before anyone wants to help you, they want money. If i had money, I would not be trying to find (My Money). I could see if I had something paying a percentage of my money to the person that helped me, but right off the bat it’s all about the mighty dollar before i can even get any help to find my money. This is just the trick of the devil. If this thing is not legit, I have paid for something and might not receive any help. I don’t mind giving a percetage if it is a sure thing, but these people on the internet are so money grafity and so full of shit. they are not trustworthy. They are just trying to get that finders fee from people and if they keep getting those fees they get alot of money and get rich off fees and can’t even help you. I don’t think this is fare.

    • unclaimedfunds says

      Linda,
      A legitimate unclaimed money finder would not charge you a fee up-front. They would only charge you a percentage if they got money back for you, and only after you received your money.
      Nobody should ever pay anyone upfront to search for their money, but if you do have someone willing to search for you on a contingency fee where they only get paid if you get money back, then there is nothing to lose.
      However, make sure you read any contract you sign very carefully.

  2. Janice Mustafa says

    I believe there is money for me under the name Janice Burt or Janice Gaffney. How do I go about getting this money that is mine. Thank you Sincerely Janice Mustafa

  3. Diane says

    I think the State of Illinois needs to do a much better job of finding people who have money in the unclaimed funds accounts! Recently, I searched on the icash website for a family member, only to find that the database is filled with inaccuracies! Not to mention, I found several friends’ names who haven’t moved in many years and still at the same address! In some cases, first names show up in the ‘last name’ column. There are accounts listed under “Estate of…” where the last name should be. For those who are really wanting to find out if there is missing property/money under http://www.icash.illinois.gov, I urge you to check several different ways. Put your first name in the last name search line (which will probably give you too many options, unless you indicate your city), or type in “Estate of” or “Trust of” in the last name line, then the last name in the first name line. In any case, the database needs a thorough clean up and the state should be doing a better job of this. The State of Indiana has a database where you can just put the last name in, and your responses will not be based on whether the name was in the right column! The search is obviously by key word – last name. Illinois should do the same!

    • unclaimedfunds says

      Diane,

      Thank you for that information. Yes, if you are doing a search try entering your last name in the first name and vice versa. That is actually one of the reasons that money ends up unclaimed.

      As far as the State of Illinois doing a better job of finding people, good luck with that!

      Nothing against the workers in the unclaimed funds division for Illinois, but a limited staff fielding calls from people looking for their own money doesn’t really leave them time to actively search for people.

      That is why you can easily find people whose first and last names come up exactly as they are that have been living at the same address and they have not collected their unclaimed money because they don’t know about it.

      That is also why being an unclaimed money finder is such an excellent business!

      The states don’t have the manpower to look for people owed money so it’s up to you to look for yourself. If you don’t know to do that, you’re lucky if a Finder contacts you. Otherwise, your money is just going to sit there.

      I hope your friends were pleasantly surprised to find out they had money being held!

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